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Anorectal manometry is a medical procedure that measures the pressure and movement of material through the anal canal and rectum. The procedure is used to diagnose fecal incontinence, constipation, and Hirschsprung’s disease.

What is Anorectal Manometry?

The procedure involves inserting a small, flexible tube into the rectum. The tube is connected to a pressure-measuring device. The device measures the pressure of the muscles in the anal canal and rectum as they contract and relax. Anorectal manometry can also measure how well the anal sphincter muscles can open and close.

What is Anorectal Manometries used to Diagnose?

Fecal incontinence: This is a condition in which you cannot control your bowel movements, leading to leakage of stool. Anorectal manometry is a test used to diagnose fecal incontinence. It measures the strength and tone of the anal sphincter muscles and the sensitivity of the nerves that control them.

Constipation: This is a condition in which you have difficulty passing stool or have infrequent bowel movements. The procedure can help determine the cause of constipation, such as blockage of the rectum or slow movement of stool through the colon.

Hirschsprung’s disease: This condition affects the large intestine and causes problems with bowel movements. Anorectal manometry can help diagnose Hirschsprung’s disease by measuring the pressure of the anal sphincter muscles.

What are the Risks of Anorectal Manometry?

It is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare but may include:

  • Bleeding: Bleeding may occur if the tube is inserted too forcefully or if there is damage to the rectal tissue. Bleeding can be controlled by applying pressure to the site of the bleeding.
  • Infection: Infection may occur if the tube is inserted too forcefully or if there is damage to the rectal tissue. Infection can be controlled by applying pressure to the site of the infection, and antibiotics may be prescribed if necessary.
  • Pain: The pain is caused by the insertion of the tube into the rectum. Pain can also be caused by the pressure of the anal sphincter muscles.
  • Rectal Perforation: Rectal perforation may occur if the tube is inserted too forcefully or if there is damage to the rectal tissue. Rectal perforation can be controlled by applying pressure to the perforation site.

Anorectal manometry is a medical procedure used to diagnose fecal incontinence, constipation, and Hirschsprung’s disease. Anorectal manometry is generally a safe procedure with few complications.

How to Prepare for an Anorectal Manometry

There are a few things you can do to prepare for an anorectal manometry. First, it is vital to empty your bowels before the procedure. You can do this by taking a laxative or enema.

You should also avoid eating or drinking for two hours before the procedure. This is because food and drink can affect the results of the manometry.

It is also essential to inform your doctor of any medications you are taking, as some medicines can affect the results of anorectal manometry. Make sure to tell your doctor if you have any allergies.

Anorectal manometry is a safe and relatively simple procedure. By following these instructions, you can help ensure that the procedure goes smoothly and that the results are accurate.

Conclusion

Anorectal manometry is a procedure that can help healthcare professionals diagnose and treat various conditions of the anus and rectum. By measuring the pressure inside these areas, doctors can better understand how well they function.

This information can be used to develop a treatment plan for patients experiencing problems such as constipation, incontinence, or pain. It’s a safe and relatively simple procedure that can provide valuable information to help improve the quality of life for those suffering from anorectal issues.

New York Gastroenterology Associates (NYGA) is a premier independent gastroenterology practice in New York City. Recognized for providing the highest quality gastroenterological care. We provide consultation and a wide range of ambulatory tests at our offices throughout New York City. Request an appointment right now to get the help you need!